Orchid
Conservation
Coalition

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Plant Restoration, Conservation and Propagation


PLANT RESTORATION, CONSERVATION AND PROPAGATION BIOTECHNOLOGY PROGRAM (University of Florida, Environmental Horticulture Department)

Researchers in the PLANT RESTORATION, CONSERVATION AND PROPAGATION BIOTECHNOLOGY PROGRAM (University of Florida, Environmental Horticulture Department) combine multiple disciplines to develop species recovery plans for Florida’s native orchids.  Studying several aspects of a plant’s biology and ecology results in a more complete picture of that species’ life strategy, and improves the likelihood of successful species conservation.

Our lab is focused on developing efficient asymbiotic and symbiotic seed germination methods for Florida’s native orchids.  While symbiotic seed germination requires more effort and expertise, resulting seedlings may be more appropriate for reintroduction projects than asymbiotic seedlings, and may exhibit greater survivorship.  Additionally, while the goal of many of our projects is to reintroduce locally adapted plant material into Florida, improving our understanding of orchid biology is essential to the long term protection of Florida’s existing orchid populations.  Studying the seed physiology, seed ecology, mycology, pollination biology, and population genetics of each species allows us to make scientifically guided management recommendations to conservation practitioners.

link to program webpage http://hort.ifas.ufl.edu/plant-restoration/kane-lab/index.shtml

Select publications:

Johnson TR, Stewart SL, Dutra D, Kane ME, Richardson L (2007) Asymbiotic and Symbiotic Seed Germination of Eulophia alta (Orchidaceae)—Preliminary Evidence for the Symbiotic Culture Advantage. Plant Cell Tiss Org Cult 90:313–323

Stewart SL, Kane ME (2007) Symbiotic seed germination and evidence for in vitro mycobionts specificity in Spiranthes brevilabris (Orchidaceae) and its implications for species-level conservation. In Vitro Cell Dev Biol Plant 43:178–186

Stewart SL & Kane ME 2007.Orchid conservation in the Americas—lessons learned in Florida. Lankesteriana 7: 382-387.

Stewart SL, Kane ME (2006) Symbiotic seed germination of Habenaria macroceratitis (Orchidaceae), a rare Florida terrestrial orchid. Plant Cell Tiss Org Cult 86:159–167

Kauth P, Vendrame WA, Kane ME (2006) In vitro germination and seedling development of Calopogon tuberosus. Plant Cell Tiss Org Cult 85:91–102

Contact Information:

Dr. Michael Kane, Professor
Plant Restoration, Conservation and Propagation Biotechnology Program
University of Florida-Environmental Horticulture Department
PO Box 110675
Gainesville, FL, USA 32608
email: micropro@ufl.edu
phone: 352-392-1831 ext. 205

Plant Restoration, Conservation and Propagation Biotechnology